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Public witness and Catholic citizenship


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Public witness on issues of public concern is natural for Catholics because we have a commitment to the common good and to the dignity of each human person. Those two pillars -- the common good and the dignity of every human person -- come right out of Scripture. They underpin all of Catholic social thought. That includes politics. Politics is where the competing moral visions of a society meet and struggle. And since a large majority of American citizens are religious believers, it makes sense for people and communities of faith to bring their faith into the public square.

As a result, if we believe that a particular issue is gravely evil and damaging to society, then we have a duty, not just a religious duty but also a democratic duty, to hold accountable the candidates who want to allow that evil. Failing to do so is an abuse of responsibility on our part, because that's where we exercise our power as citizens most directly -- in the voting booth.

The "separation of Church and state" can never mean that religious believers should be silent about legislative issues, the appointment of judges or public policy. It's not the job of the Church to sponsor political candidates. But it's very much the job of the Church to guide Catholics to think and act in accord with their faith.

So since this is an election year, here are a few simple points to remember as we move toward November.

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