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Alito: Freedom of religion, speech key to democracy but now under threat


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput of Philadelphia applauds after awarding an honorary degree to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito May 17 at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood, Pa. (CNS photo/Sarah Webb, CatholicPhilly.com)

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WYNNEWOOD, Pa. (CNS) -- The graduating class at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in the Philadelphia Archdiocese received a special treat at the Concursus graduation ceremony held in the seminary chapel May 17.

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. received an honorary doctorate of letters and delivered the formal address.

The award to Alito was "in testimony to and recognition of his many outstanding contributions to society," Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput said in his introduction, "especially in protecting the sanctity and dignity of human life, the full responsibilities of the human person and promoting true justice and lasting peace."

In his address Alito spoke of the freedom of religion as enshrined in the First Amendment of the Constitution and encroachments on that freedom today.

A southern New Jersey native, he is well versed in the history of religious toleration as it developed in Philadelphia, and the important role that religion played in the development of the Constitution, including the visits by the Founding Fathers to the city's various churches, among them Old St. Mary's, tracing back to the Revolution.

Part of freedom of religion is "no one is forced to act in violation of his own beliefs," Alito said. "Most of my life Americans were instilled in this," he added, urging his audience to "keep the flame burning."

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