Home » Nation »  Justice, mercy are twin virtues for the law, Red Mass homilist says

Justice, mercy are twin virtues for the law, Red Mass homilist says


  • Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis delivers the homily during the annual Red Mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington Oct. 2. The Mass traditionally marks the start of the court year, including the opening of the Supreme Court term. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)
  • Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl of Washington talks with U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts as they leave the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington after the annual Red Mass Oct. 2. The Mass traditionally marks the start of the court year, including the opening of the Supreme Court term. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)
  • Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas share a light moment as they leave the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington after the annual Red Mass Oct. 2. Also pictured above are Auxiliary Bishop Barry C. Knestout of Washington and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann, Catholic Standard)
  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer speaks with Washington Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl after the annual Red Mass Oct. 2 at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington. The Mass traditionally marks the start of the court year, including the opening of the Supreme Court term. (CNS photo/Joshua Roberts, Reuters)

Help us expand our reach! Please share this article

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Those involved in the administration of law should seek justice and mercy in their work, Archbishop Bernard A. Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis said Oct. 2.

"Those two virtues must intersect in our lives and actions," said the archbishop, who was the homilist at the 64th annual Red Mass at the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington.

The Red Mass in the nation's capital is celebrated just before the Supreme Court begins its term in October; opening day for the court this year was Oct. 3.

The Mass seeks God's blessing and guidance on those who work in the law, including judges, diplomats, government officials and attorneys. The Mass also was attended by university officials and law professors and students.

Washington Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl was the main celebrant of the Mass, which was attended by five Supreme Court justices: Chief Justice of the United States John G. Roberts Jr. and Supreme Court Associate Justices Anthony M. Kennedy, Clarence Thomas, Stephen G. Breyer and Samuel A. Alito Jr.

Other government officials at the Mass included U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch; U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.; and Denis McDonough, President Barack Obama's chief of staff.

Help us expand our reach! Please share this article

Submit a Letter to the Editor